Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Image from RRHS Catalog


In Bleach, a boy named Ichigo Kurosaki has the ability to see spirits that have not entirely passed on into the afterlife. His life is pretty much "normal" for his standards until he encounters Rukia Kuchiki, a shinigami (Death God) or "soul reaper" from the Soul Society that can purify spirits and send them to that kind of heaven. When Ichigo's family is jeopardized by a hollow, a corrupted spirit who lingered too long in the world of the living, Rukia lends him her powers to defeat the hollow. After, Ichigo becomes a substitute soul reaper and becomes stronger as he protects his world and the Soul Society from threats such as Espadas, bounts, and even more, for this story is extremely long. Ichigo even realizes the power of his Zanpakuto and discovers that he is not as human as he thought he was. Anyone could enjoy this series if given a chance. Bleach, while it can really drag in terms of story (not all the time), it succeeds in wonderful characterization and depth of prose. The overall concept of the story is not new, but the way in which it is executed is outstandingly impressive. This is a manga (Japanese comic), so not everyone may be drawn to the art style or outline of it, but it certainly is a very action packed and dramatic story. You would like this book if you like… Fullmetal Alchemist, Incarceron, Dragon Ball Z, and Seraph of the End.

- Sarina, RRHS Student

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Book Review: Noggin by John Corey Whaley

Image from RRHS Catalog




The main character's body keeps on failing him due to cancer. Because of this issue, many of the doctors give up on Travis. But one doctor offers to freeze Travis's mind and connect his head to a healthier body when the technology comes out. After 5 years, Travis comes back to life but doesn't realize the hardship and the shock his surroundings went through. So he tries to get his old life back but it seems impossible. His old girlfriend has a fiancé, and his best friend's having a hard time coming out of the closet. He struggles to get his girlfriend back and wishes everything were normal, but he stayed a teenager while his friends aged. His mom and Dad pretend to be happy, but they've been split up for years. After realizing that things will never be the same, Travis learns that he has to move on and find new happiness. I would recommend this book. When I picked up this book, I didn't realize I was going to finish the whole book in one go. The ending was a little disappointing because I would've liked to find out what happened more to Travis afterwards, but the development of the plot and Travis as a character were really entertaining. You would like this book if you like the emotions, humor, and drama of high school.


- Sung, RRHS Student

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Book Review: Beastly by Alex Flinn

Image from RRHS Catalog

Alex Flinn is an amazing author when it comes to teenage romance stories. Gaze into the secret love life between a beauty (Lindy) and a beast (Kyle) and how they slowly fall for each other no matter what they look like, ending in a tragic curse and changing fate. You would like this book if you like… Breathing Underwater.

Daisy, R
RHS Student

Friday, October 16, 2015

Parody: The Biscotti Kid (The Karate Kid by B.B. Hiller)


Book Review: Doctor Sleep by Stephen King


Image


The child from The Shining is now full grown, yet he still experiences the same horrors as he did when he was young and living in the old hotel with his parents. He lives alone in an old apartment, and struggles to find a way to control the "Shining." There is a cult, which possibly kills it's members, who also hold the "gift." After coming to terms with some awful ordeals and acts which he commits, he strives to find this cult which is supposed to help him. This is a great read by an excellent author. It is exciting and fulfilling. The language is excellent, and the novel in itself seems to flow along it's pages. I would recommend this novel for a mature audience, however, as it is an explicit horror novel. You would like this book if you like… horror or Stephen King.

- Kiara, RRHS Student

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Book Review: Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

Image goodreads.com


The child from The Shining is now full grown, yet he still experiences the same horrors as he did when he was young and living in the old hotel with his parents. He lives alone in an old apartment, and struggles to find a way to control the "Shining." There is a cult, which possibly kills it's members, who also hold the "gift." After coming to terms with some awful ordeals and acts which he commits, he strives to find this cult which is supposed to help him. This is a great read by an excellent author. It is exciting and fulfilling. The language is excellent, and the novel in itself seems to flow along it's pages. I would recommend this novel for a mature audience, however, as it is an explicit horror novel. You would like this book if you like… horror or Stephen King.

- Kiara, RRHS Student

Friday, October 9, 2015

Coins for Coats Drive, 2015-16

Round Rock High School raised over $1,100 during the recent 2015 Coins for Coats Drive.  

Coins for Coats is a fundraiser for the Round Rock Coats for Kids program - one of the many services that the Round Rock Area Serving Center offers the community. This program provides a coat to RRISD children enrolled in the federally funded free and reduced lunch program. Participants were able to contribute by donating via collection bins at the Dragon Library, football games, and second period classes.


For the classroom contest, the winner was…




Top 5 Runners-up…


A huge


The Round Rock Area Serving Center, which has been helping the community since 1986, is a charitable nonprofit social services agency that serves the Round Rock, Hutto, and Wells Branch areas.  Its services include a food pantry, Round Rock Coats for Kids, Community Gardens, Computers for Kids, adult computer skills training, and clothing & furniture vouchers as well as financial assistance toward rent, utilities, prescriptions, gasoline, transportation, and temporary lodging. The center is staffed primarily by volunteers and is supported by local churches, civic groups, businesses, the United Way of Williamson County, and the city of Round Rock.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Welcome Back!

Welcome to the Year of Getting Connected

Your Dragon Library welcomes you--new and returning scholars--to this freshly hatched school year! This is the year we Get Connected: to our campus, to our community, to our country, and to the rest of our cosmos. Therefore, being the alert and involved
Dragon Scholar that you are, you should be on the lookout for the inevitable wacky hijinks which the Library will be cooking up to foster and celebrate these connections. If history is any guide, it will somehow involve games, costumes, and prizes.

Themed events will include:
  • Get Connected to RRHS - Organization Fair (Fall)
  • Get Connected to RR Community - Coins for Coats Drive (Fall-October)
  • Get Connected to Country USA - Mock Election (Spring)
  • Get Connected to Our World - World Culture Fair (Spring)

It’s gonna be a great year.

Welcome to the Year of Getting Connected

Your Dragon Library welcomes you--new and returning scholars--to this freshly hatched school year! This is the year we Get Connected: to our campus, to our community, to our country, and to the rest of our cosmos. Therefore, being the alert and involved
Dragon Scholar that you are, you should be on the lookout for the inevitable wacky hijinks which the Library will be cooking up to foster and celebrate these connections. If history is any guide, it will somehow involve games, costumes, and prizes.

Themed events will include:
  • Get Connected to RRHS - Organization Fair (Fall)
  • Get Connected to RR Community - Coins for Coats Drive (Fall-October)
  • Get Connected to Country USA - Mock Election (Spring)
  • Get Connected to Our World - World Culture Fair (Spring)

It’s gonna be a great year.

Friday, August 28, 2015

Comic: How to Draw by Scott Robertson & Thomas Bertling

Looking for a good book?  Try reading this comic-style book talk of  How to Draw by Scott Robertson & Thomas Bertling.

Image from unshelved.com



Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Review: Seconds by Bryan Lee O'Malley

Image from ign.com

After a phenomenon like Scott Pilgrim, anything Bryan Lee O’Malley did next would naturally invite comparison. Seconds certainly has some things in common with Pilgrim, particularly by way of personalities, and even in terms of conventions which replace conventional exposition with a pithy caption. Our protagonist, Katie, is seemingly the polar opposite of young Mr. Pilgrim, though: a skilled overachiever, career-focused to the point of self denial, and about to open the restaurant of her dreams after years of work running Seconds, her first popular and well-regarded eatery. What she does have in common with the previous spawn of O’Malley’s pen is an unusual living arrangement — she lives in an apartment upstairs at Seconds — and an uncanny ability to adapt in all the worst ways to bizarre situations.

The night a quiet, oddball new waitress has her forearms badly burned by hot grease, Katie discovers a box in her dresser with a mushroom, a notepad, and a set of instructions:
  • Write your mistake
  • Ingest one mushroom
  • Go to sleep
  • Wake anew
She does so, and when she wakes up, the young lady’s accident never happened. Soon afterward, she stumbles on a vast supply of mushrooms, and there her troubles truly begin.

O'Malley's characters are highly stylized, in a much-hipper-than-reality sort of way, but still able to convey emotion well. The story mechanic breaks the narrative at critical junctures, leaving a great deal of whitespace on the page as the grid of panels also breaks as each new reality replaces the old. Combined with a change in palette in which everything reddens, the reader is primed to see what comes next, especially as the complications mount and the story’s position on the recursively iterating tree of possibility drifts further and further from any familiar reality.

When traditional superstition steps into the everyday, Neil Gaiman’s oeuvre stands as a high-water mark. O’Malley invokes shades of Gaiman as Katie is sternly warned and yet sallies on into the dangerous unknown, but for better or worse, he does not drop upon his protagonist the full weight of her transgressions, allowing for a happy ending for just about everyone. Seconds is a tightly-woven story, compact in concept, straying only rarely, which makes for a highly satisfying tale.

RET3, Guest Blogger





Monday, June 15, 2015

Dragon Library Summer Hours Prevent Students from Melting All Over Sidewalk in Puddles of Soggy Ennui



Will it be hot? If decades of Texanhood are any indication: Yes! Will it be rainy? Also, because El Niño: Apparently Yes!! While this summer break is shaping up to be an excellent one if you love free outdoor saunas, when being scorched, soaked, or both simultaneously gets to be a drag, having a good book to dive into is an excellent reason to lounge about somewhere climate controlled.

Your Dragon Library is here with the hook up: words (and sometimes pictures!) in handy volumes, good for enjoying in the sun at a pool or beach, or while shunning the burning sky-orb at a cafe, or on a nice, cool sofa. They can be read for entertainment or edification, displayed strategically to start conversation or advertise an interest where social media profiles and witty t-shirts won’t do, or used to partially conceal one’s face while scoping out the scene.

“But it’s summer!” hypothetical you says, hypothetically, adding, “And our Beloved Dragon Library is closed until next school year, duh!” Not so! From 10:00 AM until Noon, June 17, July 8, 15, 29, and August 5, we will be open, staffed, and pleased as punch to check out up to 5 items. Don’t worry about taking another whole partial morning out of your busy summertide to return the items, though: they’ll only come due next school year!


- RET3, Guest Blogger



Dragon Library Summer Hours Prevent Students from Melting All Over Sidewalk in Puddles of Soggy Ennui


Will it be hot? If decades of Texanhood are any indication: Yes! Will it be rainy? Also, because El Niño: Apparently Yes!! While this summer break is shaping up to be an excellent one if you love free outdoor saunas, when being scorched, soaked, or both simultaneously gets to be a drag, having a good book to dive into is an excellent reason to lounge about somewhere climate controlled.

Your Dragon Library is here with the hook up: words (and sometimes pictures!) in handy volumes, good for enjoying in the sun at a pool or beach, or while shunning the burning sky-orb at a cafe, or on a nice, cool sofa. They can be read for entertainment or edification, displayed strategically to start conversation or advertise an interest where social media profiles and witty t-shirts won’t do, or used to partially conceal one’s face while scoping out the scene.

“But it’s summer!” hypothetical you says, hypothetically, adding, “And our Beloved Dragon Library is closed until next school year, duh!” Not so! From 10:00 AM until Noon, June 17, July 8, 15, 29, and August 5, we will be open, staffed, and pleased as punch to check out up to 5 items. Don’t worry about taking another whole partial morning out of your busy summertide to return the items, though: they’ll only come due next school year!


- RET3, Guest Blogger

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Book Review: The Sculptor by Scott McCloud

Image from


David Smith is a sculptor at the end of his rope, having blown his moment in the spotlight of the New York art scene and possessed of little save his idiosyncratic set of promises to himself. While spending his last few dollars in a diner, he is joined by his uncle, who he soon realizes is not the man he remembers. Death, bound in human form until its last link to the living is broken, offers his host's nephew the power to make the shapes in his mind reality in exchange for a hard limit on his remaining time among the living: 200 days. By the end of the first part, David is a real character. Not simply a sad sack, nor merely a victim of his own introversion and iconoclastic tendencies, his backstory and path to the state in which we find him are crisply laid out, but not with the excessive precision often lavished on exposition to get it out of the way; the other characters draw these details to the surface for us as the tale progresses. His chance transformation into a viral video star puts him in contact with guerilla actress-slash-bike courier Meg and her found family of artists and hard-luck strays like himself. McCloud takes pains not to make their relationship seem too foreordained or too permanent. David's grim chess-playing benefactor advises against it for her sake, but it does eventually and surprisingly gel distressingly close to the end, and in a way which canny readers might realize well in advance of the explanation will make the plans hatched by the lovebirds as the clock ticks down all for naught. Meg herself is not some insubstantial manic pixie dream girl without well-developed problems of her own. McCloud presents her experiencing repeated depressive episodes, and her long-term friends take issue with what they perceive as David's lack of seriousness, unsuitability to assist, and even his role in enabling her resistance to taking her medication, all of which underscore Death's advice.

McCloud has long been highly self-critical about his artistic skill, generally citing a lack of dynamism in form as his weakness. While in his now quarter-century old ZOT! comics he sometimes managed to make a flying superhero look a bit stiff, here he makes a poor stiff, David -- forbidden from superheroics by Death -- look quite expressive, indeed. His power to reshape matter can be exercised by mere touch,but McCloud draws him as an artist immersed in the creative process, using muscle and motion to conduct stone, steel, glass, wood, etc., into new forms like an emphatic maestro leading an orchestra. He dives into blocks of stone, rolls up sidewalks, and bends I-beams with his bare hands.Outside the panels, McCloud reaches deep into the toolbox he examined in Understanding Comics and uses the layout to help set tone and even suggest when a world beyond David's intrudes. In every two-page opening, at least one panel bleeds to the edge, perhaps leading in or out of a scene; in scenes of great passion, be they artistic, carnal, or otherwise, the panel boundaries contract to almost nothing, and the action flows uninhibited from panel to panel. The dichromatic color printing is used to good effect as well, with blues fading from bold to atmospheric, allowing the city to be present but distant in some places, and suffocating in others without requiring too much heavy linework.

The Sculptor is a great modern low fantasy story which could have easily gone any number of directions under its establishing premise but chose to be a well-grounded exploration of its characters and how their grand and banal motivations, in turn, betray them and drive them to leave a mark before shuffling off.

- RET3, Guest Blogger

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Book Review: Divergent by Veronica Roth

Image from


A 16 year old girl comes to a point in her life where she has to decide to abandon her family or lead a happier fuller life. The girl takes a chance and begins to realize what it really means to be selfless, like her family in Abnegation (her origin faction). Along the way, she makes new friends and overcomes great struggles in her adventures. I recommend this book because it is very busy and never stops. The plot is amazing! This made me start reading books again. You would like this book if you like… The Hunger Games, The Giver, or The Maze Runner.

- Destiny, RRHS Student

Sunday, April 26, 2015

2015 National Library Week Celebration: A Renaissance Affair (April 27 - May 1, 2015)

This National Library Week, your library invites you to celebrate the genre that whisks you away from the everyday to a time and place far away, one of swords and sorcery, quests and creatures, danger and discovery, and absolutely no friendly vampires: High Fantasy! The era which serves as the inspiration for so many high fantasy tropes coincided with a time when people believed that dragons existed in forms that were not komodo, frilled, fly, lilly, metaphorical, or you and your classmates, a time capped off by the Renaissance. All this week, visit your library before school and during lunch to enjoy Renaissance Festivities:

  • Monday: Jousting!
  • Tuesday: Fortune Telling with Madame Oubetcha!
  • Wednesday: Quoits!
  • Thursday: Photo Booth!
  • Friday: Wii Renaissance Games!

2015 National Library Week Celebration: A Renaissance Affair (April 27 - May 1, 2015)

This National Library Week, your library invites you to celebrate the genre that whisks you away from the everyday to a time and place far away, one of swords and sorcery, quests and creatures, danger and discovery, and absolutely no friendly vampires: High Fantasy! The era which serves as the inspiration for so many high fantasy tropes coincided with a time when people believed that dragons existed in forms that were not komodo, frilled, fly, lilly, metaphorical, or you and your classmates, a time capped off by the Renaissance. All this week, visit your library before school and during lunch to enjoy Renaissance Festivities:

  • Monday: Jousting!
  • Tuesday: Fortune Telling with Madame Oubetcha!
  • Wednesday: Quoits!
  • Thursday: Photo Booth!
  • Friday: Wii Renaissance Games!

- RET3, Guest Blogger

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Book Review: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Image from amazon.com


The Sinclair Family is an old moneyed family that vacations every year on their private island off the coast of Massachusetts. Harris and Tipper Sinclair look forward to seeing their children and grandchildren every summer. One year, Gat comes to the island. He is the nephew of one of the sisters' boyfriend. Gat does not have blond hair like the rest of the Sinclairs. He is Indian. Gat is taken in by the older grandchildren: Cady, Mirren and Johnny. The family calls them the Liars. Cady and Gat have an instant connection. Towards the end of Summer Fifteen, Cady has an accident that impairs her memories. She skips a summer going to the island. The next summer she goes back and finds the main house has been razed and rebuilt in a new and very modern style. As the summer continues, Cady learns from the other Liars what she can't remember. What really happened on the island that summer? The answer will shock you. I would definitely recommend this book if you love suspense; you will be compelled to finish it in one sitting. You would like this book if you like… suspense or mystery novels.


- Becky, RRHS Staff

Monday, March 23, 2015

Quiz: Which John Green book are you?


Photo from http://hankandjohn.com/

Click on the image of John Green books to take the Buzzfeed.com quiz and find out which John Green book you would be!


John Green himself took the quiz and got The Fault in Our Stars. Your RRHS Librarians took it, too! Mrs. Pavone got Let It Snow and Mrs. Taylor got Will Grayson, Will Grayson

Which book are you?


Movie Trailer for John Green's Paper Towns


Books 2 Movies: John Green's Paper Towns


Thursday, March 12, 2015

Makerspace Hot Wheels Challenge!


RRHS Makerspace has a challenge for students and faculty/staff!Using Hot Wheels Track Builder components and gravity, participants are challenged to create a track that will send their car through the speedometer at the exact speed required.  The Challenge is available to everyone in the Library before school and during lunches.  Come play and learn with us!

The Challenge:
Use gravity to hit 600!
Create a track that includes the loop and the curve.

Put the speedometer at the end of your track and, using only gravity, your car must hit 600 exactly.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Win Prizes through RR 101: Education For Life


Attend College and Career events sanctioned by RRHS and be entered to win some awesome prizes through the Library annual theme...Round Rock 101: Education for Life.

We will be giving away a tablet, power bricks and college/career book packages. To be entered to win, students must attend events that provide information about college or careers and be sure to sign in. Examples of this would be the A+ Federal Credit Union presentations, the RRISD College Fair or the Hour of Code.

Visit the Library to get more information.

Book Review: Out of The Easy by Ruta Sepetys

Image from

A girl from New Orleans, living in the shadow of her mother's ragged reputation, is trying to find a better life for herself but constantly is getting dragged down by her mom. Her mother stopped playing her role as a caring mom when they moved to New Orleans, when she was taken under the business of Willie. Willie knew Josie's mom was just a service to her but saw something more in Josie, who needed to be more than just some meat for men. Josie aspired to get out of this world her mother had made so dark for her and go to college, make something of herself - go somewhere her mother's name wasn't known and make one for herself. With the backing of Willie, her closest friends, and the family she had made for herself, she was going to college. I would recommend this book, especially to those serving their senior year. Right now, we are all thinking about college, all wanting to make a better life for ourselves. This book gives us hope, that if we want something, we need to go out and get it. This book showed that any kid can make it to college, you just have to put yourself out there and go for the things you really want. Josie had no resources, no help from counselors, teachers or her parent. As students, we are lucky to have all the help we need to get ready for college. This book is inspiring to all students and is an amazing read. You would like this book if you like… Between Shades Of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

- Estrella, RRHS Student

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Book Review: Son of the Mob by Gordon Korman

Image fromgoodreads.com

Son of the Mob, by Gordon Korman, is a comedic teen romance novel with similar circumstances to Romeo and Juliet. Vince, the main character, is the son of Anthony Lucca who is the head of the mob. Vince falls in love with Kendra Brightly, the daughter of Agent Brightly, the FBI agent investigating Vince’s father. See what adventures their love takes them on. You would like this book if you like…Flipped


- Andy, RRHS Student

Friday, February 20, 2015

Book Review: Arranged Marriage by Chitra Banerjee Divakarun

Image fromchitradivakaruni.com

Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni tells us many short stories about how the ocean separates the young women of India from their home, bringing to life the lives Indian wives live when brought to America - showing the pros and cons of their lives and expressing her opinion throughout all her stories. You would like this book if you like… listening to lives of people that live behind closed doors.

- Bobbi, RRHS Student

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Blind Date with a Book



For Valentine's Day fun, the RRHS Library is offering readers the chance for a "blind date" with a book.

How does it work? Readers may choose from a variety of pre-selected books that have been wrapped. Each book tells the reader only the genre that the book belongs to. Readers can select books from the table and take them up to check out. Only after checking the book out, may the reader unwrap the book and see what they got.

Come join us, select a "blind date" book, and find your next great read!

When you're finished, rate your date.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Book Review: The Nazi Hunters by Neal Bascomb

Image from juniorlibraryguild.com


This book starts out by telling the reader about the involvement of a man named Adolf Eichmann in the Holocaust. They set out and try to capture this man and take him to trial for his wrong doings. I would recommend this book to others because the action keeps you into it. Above all that though, it is a non-fiction book, so you will be learning as well as being entertained. You would like this book if you like… history and action.


- Brandon, RRHS Student

Friday, January 30, 2015

Comic: Brief Thief, by Michaël Escoffier and Kris Di Giacomo


Looking for a good book?  Try reading this comic-style book talk of Brief Thief, by MichaëEscoffier and Kris Di Giacomo.

Image from unshelved.com

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Read a Letter from Visiting Author, Joe Shine!


This Thursday, January 29th, author Joe Shine will be visiting Round Rock High School to talk with students and staff. If you would like to learn more about Joe Shine, you can read his Dear Teen Me letter or click on his photo to access his biography.

Dear Teen Me is a publication that asks published authors to write a letter to their teen selves.

Monday, January 26, 2015

Comic: Frank Einstein and the Antimatter Motor, by John Scieszka and Brian Biggs

Looking for a good book?  Try reading this comic-style book talk of Frank Einstein and the Antimatter Motor, by John Scieszka and Brian Biggs.

Comic from unshelved.com